US Global Health Policy

U.S. Global Health Policy
 {Photo credit: Christian Connections for International Health (CCIH).}Dr. Zipporah Kpamor, chief of party of MSH Nigeria (right), and Michael Gerson, Washington Post columnist (left), participate in the family planning discussion in Washington, DC.Photo credit: Christian Connections for International Health (CCIH).

On December 3, Management Sciences for Health participated in an event organized by Christian Connections for International Health (CCIH) on the importance of family planning for reducing maternal deaths and improving child survival. The informative Capitol Hill panel discussion (Where Do Christians Stand on Family Planning? Voices from the Global South) dispelled several misconceptions about Christian views on family planning and examined the under-reported role that many Christian organizations play in this sector. Panelists addressed two key myths.

Myth: Family planning equals abortion

Reverend Richard Cizik, the President of the New Evangelical Partnership for the Common Good, said this myth is the most persistent and inaccurate. In fact, family planning encompasses a range of health interventions ranging from healthy timing and spacing of pregnancies, counseling and education, breastfeeding, and contraceptive use.

Mildred Fernando shares her story of surviving XDR-TB at a symposium in Japan.

I never thought that being sick with tuberculosis (TB) for a decade would lead me to this purpose: being an advocate to fight and eliminate this disease--not just in my country, the Philippines, but all over the world.

I was recently invited by RESULTS Japan to represent TB patients' perspectives in the call for continuous funding from the Japanese government to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund). The advocacy activities, led by Results Japan, were in support to the Global Fund Fourth Replenishment which aims to secure financing for the years 2014-2016.

{Photo by Warren Zelman}Photo by Warren Zelman

Advancing a health systems strengthening approach to HIV & AIDS requires advocacy and education, especially of decision makers. In honor of World AIDS Day 2013 (December 1, observed in some places December 2) we invite you to commemorate the day wherever you are, and help our global family achieve an AIDS-free generation.

{Photo credit: Warren Zellman}Photo credit: Warren Zellman

I remember attending the Durban international AIDS conference in 2000, my first. That was the one where everything was going to turn around and we were going get a handle on the epidemic. Nelson Mandela spoke at that one, in a hall that was the size of three football fields. And the crowd was joyous, raucous, the noise was deafening and it was one of the most memorable days of my life. 

Before Mandela took the stage, a choir made up of kids—none more than 9 or 10 years of age and many much younger—took the stage to sing tribute to the great man and those of us gathering there.

It was charming and sweet. Everyone had a huge grin on their faces. And then I realized that this group of kids was special, maybe overheard someone nearby or perhaps the MC say that this, “was THAT group.” All were infected with the virus, and as I watched these gorgeous children singing so strong, moving and smiling and clapping with everyone, I knew, knew inside, that they probably wouldn’t live much longer.

{Photo credit: Todd Shapera}Photo credit: Todd Shapera

Representatives from MSH are participating in events related to global health and the post-2015 development agenda during U.N. General Assembly (UNGA) week in New York City. Follow updates from UNGA week, viewed through the lens of MSH's advocacy for universal health coverage (UHC) as a post-2015 development priority. 

 

 {Photo credit: MSH/Filmona Hailemichael}Dr. Florence Guillaume, Minister of Health of Haiti.Photo credit: MSH/Filmona Hailemichael

On June 7, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) and partners hosted Dr. Florence Guillaume, the Minister of Health of Haiti, and panelists for a Capitol Hill luncheon on community health workers in fragile states. The day before, MSH hosted Guillaume in Cambridge, MA, for a town-hall style event on improving maternal and child health. Revisit the two events through a "Storify" story of photos, text, and tweets.

{Photo credit: kjetil_r via Flickr}Photo credit: kjetil_r via Flickr

In a landmark 6-2 decision, the US Supreme Court ruled unconstitutional a 2003 law requiring organizations that receive US government funding for global health work on HIV & AIDS to have a policy explicitly opposing prostitution. The plaintiffs in the USAID v. AOSI case included the Global Health Council (GHC), Pathfinder, the Alliance for Open Society International (AOSI), and InterAction.

In a letter to GHC members, Jonathan D. Quick, MD, MPH, chairman of the GHC board of directors and MSH president and CEO, said:

Did you notice that our website looks and feels really different?

We've redesigned and rebuilt our site from the ground up: showcasing our unique technical expertise and staff, values, global footprint, and mission to save lives and improve health among the poorest and most vulnerable around the world. 

We also have integrated our Global Health Impact blog into the website to continue cutting-edge discussions on global health.  

And we've made the new MSH.org easier to use.     

Learn more about the new MSH.org

Watch the short video -- and see some of the new features firsthand:

In a couple of days, thousands of decision-makers, leaders, advocates, health professionals, media, and more will gather to focus on our most valuable investment: women and girls.

We are honored to be a Gold Sponsor and Advisory Group member of Women Deliver 2013. Over 30 staff members representing 10 countries will participate in the conference by speaking, moderating, leading, and learning together with the 5,000 attendees in Kuala Lumpur.

For over 40 years, MSH has worked shoulder-to-shoulder in partnership with over 150 countries---currently in over 65---saving lives and improving the health of women, girls, men, and boys. Our programs empower women; sensitize men; and integrate maternal, newborn, and child health, family planning and reproductive health, and HIV & AIDS services to improve access to quality care and, ultimately, save lives.

[A woman talks with Belkis Giorgis (right)] {Photo credit: Dominic Chavez, 2011}A woman talks with Belkis Giorgis (right)Photo credit: Dominic Chavez, 2011

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