global health

Dr. Ronald O'Connor, Founder of MSH, and Marcia Herrera, Director of Talent Management at MSH, co-authored this blog post.

Dr. David Sencer died on Monday, May 2, 2011 in Atlanta, Georgia at age 86. He died at Emory University Hospital, due to complications of heart disease.

Dr. Sencer, one of the major twentieth century public health thought leaders, was also one of the rarest: a warm-hearted, modest man of great accomplishments and lifelong dedication to Management Sciences for Health's mission of closing the gap between what is known and what is done to solve important public health problems around the world.

From 1986 until his retirement in 1993, Dr. Sencer was a valued MSH colleague and advisor; he served in the roles of Chief Operating Officer and Senior Fellow. Dr. Sencer led by empowering others; he believed that more could and would be done when leaders put the action, and often the visibility, in the hands of those most directly on the front lines of practical public health action.

Indeed, Dr. Sencer was doing it long before MSH was conceived, in a career that spanned many personal and professional challenges: Dr. Sencer overcame tuberculosis as a young physician and went on to lead many important health initiatives and institutions.

Children in Southern Sudan

Malaria is preventable and curable, yet every year it kills more than a million people throughout the world and tens of thousands in Southern Sudan alone.  Malaria infection remains the highest cause of morbidity and mortality in Southern Sudan. Every year, thousands in Southern Sudan die unnecessarily due to lack of access to appropriate prevention and treatment. In the wake of nearly 50 years of civil war, the country is hastening towards independence and a future with unlimited potential. Yet, every death brought about by malaria steals another life from contributing to the nation’s future.

The US Agency for International Aid (USAID)-funded, Management Sciences for Health (MSH)-led Sudan Health Transformation Project, Phase 2 (SHTP II) is working to combat this scourge. Through 165 health facilities in 14 counties and 10 states, SHTP II is providing vital services to prevent and treat malaria. 

For 40 years, MSH has promoted equal access to health care for women by strengthening health systems and building the capacity of women as leaders and managers, technical experts, clinicians, and community health workers. Management Sciences for Health celebrates International Women's Day, March 8, 2011. Meet the women who inspire us.

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