May 2020

{Asther Zabibu, an MDR-TB survivor sits outside the TB treatment centre at Mulago National Referral Hospital in Uganda. where she now provides psycho-social support to other patients and counsels them on adherence. Photo Credit: Sarah Lagot}Asther Zabibu, an MDR-TB survivor sits outside the TB treatment centre at Mulago National Referral Hospital in Uganda. where she now provides psycho-social support to other patients and counsels them on adherence. Photo Credit: Sarah Lagot

For some groups of particularly vulnerable people - the elderly, disabled, those suffering from physical and mental ill-health or those at risk of violence and abuse - the restrictive measures have a significant and negative effect. These people’s health and wellbeing, in all senses, are being corroded. In some cases, people are in extremely threatening and deadly situations.

So who is making these decisions on isolation and lockdowns? How do their judgments take into consideration the wider impact on the population and the secondary effects of these restrictions, especially on vulnerable people? We, a group of colleagues working on universal health coverage, decided to do a rapid analysis of 24 national COVID-19 Taskforces to identify their composition and investigate their decision-making processes. What we found out was shocking.

{A lab scientist at a general hospital in northern Nigeria. Photo Credit: MSH Staff}A lab scientist at a general hospital in northern Nigeria. Photo Credit: MSH Staff

{Nwando Mba, Director of Public Health Laboratory Services at the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control (NCDC)}Nwando Mba, Director of Public Health Laboratory Services at the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control (NCDC)Nwando Mba is the Director of Public Health Laboratory Services at the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control (NCDC), a sub-recipient to the Resilient and Sustainable Systems for Health (RSSH) project, funded by the Global Fund and managed by MSH. A medical laboratory scientist by profession, Mba started her career over 30 years ago in Nigeria’s Vaccine Production Laboratory at Yaba, Lagos. Mba discusses Nigeria’s efforts to increase the country’s testing capacity for coronavirus.

What does your typical day look like right now at the NCDC?