Stories

Unable to work, Rasel worried about how his family would survive while he went through treatment for drug-resistant TB.Photo credit: Challenge TB Bangladesh

Bangladesh is a global hotspot for TB, and the country’s government and its partners are hard at work to find and treat missing cases of TB and prevent the spread of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). The available treatment for MDR-TB is expensive, lengthy, and complex, and the disease is often considered a death sentence.

One of the first patients in Bangladesh to receive the shorter treatment regimen, Billal survived multi-drug resistant TB and returned to his life and his family.Photo credit: Challenge TB Bangladesh

Living with TB is very hard, and living with drug-resistant TB (DR-TB) is even worse. The drugs needed to treat DR-TB are not only toxic but also very expensive, and treatment can take as long as two years to complete. In April 2017, with the support of USAID’s Challenge TB (CTB) project, Bangladesh started its first patients on a shorter treatment regimen for DR-TB.

 {Photo credit: Kenza Abu-Arja/MSH}From left to right: Chris Collins; Loyce Pace; Willo Brock.Photo credit: Kenza Abu-Arja/MSH

On July 16, Management Sciences for Health (MSH), in conjunction with the office of Congressman Ami Bera (D-CA), hosted “The rising threat of antimicrobial resistance: What happens when diseases resist the drugs that we’ve designed to fight them?” to discuss antimicrobial resistance (AMR), its consequences, and the efforts needed to fight it. This event, the second in a series on global health security funded by the James M. and Cathleen D.

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