Stories

This story was originally published on the MTaPS Program website By Dr. Zubayer Hussain, Senior Manager, MTaPS The hospital in Bangladesh does not lack for new equipment. It has a shiny new machine to deliver anesthesia, for one, and a state-of-the-art x-ray machine. There’s one catch: Much of the equipment lies unused.

{Photo credit: Aor Ikyaabo/MSH}Binta Ejo addresses USAID General Counsel Craig Wolf during a visit in October 2019. “I want to thank the American people who, through USAID, saved me and my girls with the continuum of HIV services at Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital. We are grateful.”Photo credit: Aor Ikyaabo/MSH

Binta Ejo was diagnosed with HIV in 2006. As a young, single woman, she struggled to cope with her diagnosis but listened when her sister encouraged her to seek treatment. Today, she is the proud mother to three-year-old twin girls, born HIV-free, and works as an HIV case manager at the same hospital that helped her live positively with HIV. This transformation took place after she joined a support group meeting at the Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital (UDUTH) in Sokoto, Northwest Nigeria. Binta’s support group became a source of strength.

{Photo credit: Aor Ikyaabo/MSH}Abdulkadir Kayode is an active member and leader in his adolescents-only support group.Photo credit: Aor Ikyaabo/MSH

Five years ago, 17-year-old Abdulkadir Kayode was diagnosed with HIV and too ill to attend school. He had lost his parents to HIV-related illnesses and was shunned by his classmates and neighbors for his condition. Today, Abdulkadir has achieved viral suppression, is attending school every day, and dreams of becoming a soccer player and successful businessman.

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