A health worker showing the app used during the SMC in the village of Guéné. Photo credit Jocelyn Akakpo

Originally published by the U.S. President's Malaria Initiative. While the rainy season brings welcome relief to farmers in northern Benin, the wet weather also brings an unwelcome guest: mosquitoes. These mosquitoes can spread malaria, a disease that threatens hundreds of thousands of children’s lives across the region.But malaria can be prevented with several interventions, including medications provided during seasonal malaria chemoprevention (SMC). When the summer rain arrives, health workers supported by USAID through the U.S.

{A health worker administers a COVID-19 test in Antananarivo, Madagascar. Photo credit: Misa Rahantason/MSH}A health worker administers a COVID-19 test in Antananarivo, Madagascar. Photo credit: Misa Rahantason/MSH

Originally published in The Hill 

By Marian W. Wentworth and Wade Warren 

On Dec. 14, the United States crossed a grisly milestone of 300,000 lives lost to the coronavirus pandemic. That same week, we saw the first glimmer of light in this long, dark tunnel of a year as frontline health care workers began to receive an effective vaccine. 

{Photo credit: Misa Rahantason/MSH} Photo credit: Misa Rahantason/MSH

Originally published on LinkedIn by MSH President and CEO, Marian W. Wentworth

A health worker takes a blood sample from an XDR-TB patient at Kitgum Hospital in northern Uganda. Photo credit: Diana Tumuhairwe/MSH

Originally published by Global Health NOW

As the COVID-19 scourge intensifies, it may be weakening our battle against tuberculosis—but pooling resources could boost the fight against both diseases.

While human and financial TB resources have been diverted to fight the pandemic, new TB case notifications have dropped by up to 75% in some countries, according to a Global Fund report published in September. In addition, TB service disruptions could lead to an additional 1.4 million deaths through 2025.

 {Photo credit: Rejoice Phiri/MSH}Patuma Mustafa (left) meets with members of Kalembo Health Center Management Committee.Photo credit: Rejoice Phiri/MSH

Namaseko, nine months pregnant, was taking an afternoon nap at Kalembo Health Center in Balaka, Malawi when she suddenly needed a bathroom. As she carefully got up, she remembered that there was no toilet in the maternity wing; she would have to walk to the further side of the health center to use the pit latrines near the outpatient department.

MSH, as a partner to the government of Nigeria and sub-recipient to Catholic Relief Services, supports the Global Fund Malaria grant in building Nigeria’s capacity to implement malaria control activities, strengthen the quality of care for malaria, and improve the use of health data across 13 states.

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