Women's, Children's, and Adolescents' Health: Our Impact

{Photo credit: Aor Ikyaabo/MSH}Binta Ejo addresses USAID General Counsel Craig Wolf during a visit in October 2019. “I want to thank the American people who, through USAID, saved me and my girls with the continuum of HIV services at Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital. We are grateful.”Photo credit: Aor Ikyaabo/MSH

Binta Ejo was diagnosed with HIV in 2006. As a young, single woman, she struggled to cope with her diagnosis but listened when her sister encouraged her to seek treatment. Today, she is the proud mother to three-year-old twin girls, born HIV-free, and works as an HIV case manager at the same hospital that helped her live positively with HIV. This transformation took place after she joined a support group meeting at the Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital (UDUTH) in Sokoto, Northwest Nigeria. Binta’s support group became a source of strength.

{Photo credit: Aor Ikyaabo/MSH}Abdulkadir Kayode is an active member and leader in his adolescents-only support group.Photo credit: Aor Ikyaabo/MSH

Five years ago, 17-year-old Abdulkadir Kayode was diagnosed with HIV and too ill to attend school. He had lost his parents to HIV-related illnesses and was shunned by his classmates and neighbors for his condition. Today, Abdulkadir has achieved viral suppression, is attending school every day, and dreams of becoming a soccer player and successful businessman.

Maziko Matemba, Community Health Ambassador of Malawi, is introduced by Hellen Dzoole Mwale, Technical Director for Demand Creation, ONSE Health Activity. Photo Credit: Rejoice Phiri/MSH

In Malawi, where 84% of people live in rural areas and 24% do not live close to a health facility, improving access to quality, community-based care is a key step on the journey toward universal health care coverage. At a special event held in Lilongwe on December 12, 2019, health rights activist Maziko Matemba was named the first Community Health Ambassador of Malawi.

Police leaders at a LINKAGES training. Photo credit: LINKAGES/MSH

At the beginning of LINKAGES, peer educator Maria* was training female sex workers (FSW) on HIV prevention in a busy nightclub in downtown Luanda when police detained her. Maria spent several hours at the police station before she was able to explain that she was an outreach worker with the Associação Beneficente Cristã (ABC) under the LINKAGES Project.

Members of the KJK team (from left to right: Mariame Sene Diallo, Hawa Coulibaly Kone, Hammouda Bellamine, Aicha Diarra and Justine Dembele)

Led by Johns Hopkins University’s Center for Communication Programs and in partnership with Management Sciences for Health, the Palladium Group, and a number of local implementing partners in Mali, the USAID-funded Keneya Jemu Kan (KJK) project (communication and health prevention) aims to promote key healthy behaviors and increase the demand for and use of high-impact health services and commodities.

{Photo credit: Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH}Photo credit: Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH

Read the announcement in EnglishDes prix totalisant près de 600 000 dollars US destinés à améliorer la santé des femmes, des enfants, et des adolescents ont été attribués à des coalitions de la société civile dans neuf paysManagement Sciences for Health (MSH), le Mécanisme de financement mondial (Global Financing Facility-GFF), et le Partenariat pour la santé des mères, des nouveau-nés et des enfants (Partnership for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health-PMNCH) sont heureux d'annoncer les

{Photo credit: Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH}Photo credit: Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH

>>Cliquez ici pour lire l'annonce en français Awards totaling nearly $600,000 to improve women’s, children’s, and adolescents’ health made to civil society coalitions in nine countries.Management Sciences for Health (MSH), the Global Financing Facility (GFF), and the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health (PMNCH) are pleased to announce the recipients of the first round of funding from the Small Grants Mechanism to support civil society engagement, alignment, and coordinated action for improved women’s, children’s, and adolescents&rs

 {Photo Credit: Warren Zelman}A mother holds her newborn at a hospital in Mwene-Ditu, Democratic Republic of the CongoPhoto Credit: Warren Zelman

By Kimberly Whipkey, Advocacy Manager, White Ribbon AllianceThis story was originally published by the White Ribbon AllianceNearly five years into the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) era, maternal mortality rates worldwide are still unacceptably high. Why?It’s not for a lack of technical know-how.

Kitty (far left) attends a Community Health Action Group meeting to discuss ways to improve their reach in the community.

Story by Sam Sande, District WASH Officer, and Rejoice Phiri, Communications Manager, USAID’s ONSE Health Activity“Faliya and I have built over 14 toilets and we are not slowing down,” says Kitty Kachingwe Likuda, a resident of Khanyizira in Malawi’s southern district of Mulanje.The lack of proper sanitation and hygiene remains one of the greatest barriers to global development. Approximately 47% of households in rural areas of Malawi still lack access to an improved sanitation facility, which commonly leads to waterborne illnesses such as diarrhea.

 {Photo credit: David J. Olson}Madame Togo Kadiatou Mallé, president of Muso Yiriwa Ton.Photo credit: David J. Olson

by David OlsonThis story was originally published by K4Health The first five times the sales manager of Keneya Jemu Kan came looking for Madame Togo Kadiatou Mallé to talk about her women’s association selling condoms and other health products, she ran away and hid, so terrified was she of the prospect of having to work with condoms.But the sales manager’s persistence paid off. Eventually, they talked, and Madame Togo has become such an enthusiastic condom promoter, she is known as Mama Condom.

Pages