Keneya Jemu Kan (KJK): Our Impact

Members of the KJK team (from left to right: Mariame Sene Diallo, Hawa Coulibaly Kone, Hammouda Bellamine, Aicha Diarra and Justine Dembele)

Led by Johns Hopkins University’s Center for Communication Programs and in partnership with Management Sciences for Health, the Palladium Group, and a number of local implementing partners in Mali, the USAID-funded Keneya Jemu Kan (KJK) project (communication and health prevention) aims to promote key healthy behaviors and increase the demand for and use of high-impact health services and commodities.

 {Photo credit: David J. Olson}Madame Togo Kadiatou Mallé, president of Muso Yiriwa Ton.Photo credit: David J. Olson

by David OlsonThis story was originally published by K4Health The first five times the sales manager of Keneya Jemu Kan came looking for Madame Togo Kadiatou Mallé to talk about her women’s association selling condoms and other health products, she ran away and hid, so terrified was she of the prospect of having to work with condoms.But the sales manager’s persistence paid off. Eventually, they talked, and Madame Togo has become such an enthusiastic condom promoter, she is known as Mama Condom.

{Photo credit: Alpha Macky Kane}Photo credit: Alpha Macky Kane

On March 8, the USAID-funded Communications and Promotion of Health (Keneya Jemu Kan or KJK) project in Mali celebrated International Women’s Day to highlight both the challenges women face in exercising their right to health and opportunities to overcome systemic barriers that affect women’s health and wellbeing.KJK, which aims to promote key health behaviors and increase the demand for and use of high-impact health services and commodities, wanted to use the day to honor the work of the women engaged in the project while promoting good health practices for all women in Mali.

The delegation of Mali during the SBCC summit.

MSH staff in Mali working for the Debbo Alafia Consortium and the USAID-Keneya Jemu Khan (KJK) project participated in the Francophone Summit for Social and Behavior Change Communication (SBCC) in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire, Feb.