Pharmaceutical Management: Our Impact

 Dr. Rabia Kahveci presents at a Ukraine's first national national health technology assessment forum.

MSH congratulates Dr. Rabia Kahveci for her appointment as board vice president and president-elect of Health Technology Assessment international (HTAi), a nonprofit organization dedicated to fostering health technology assessments worldwide. The two-year appointment will lead to Dr. Kahveci assuming the presidency of the organization in 2023. Dr. Kahveci is MSH’s senior technical advisor for pharmaceutical policy and governance and has also served as a board director with HTAi from 2014 to 2020 and as chair of the HTAi Developing Countries Interest Group and co-chair of the Medical Devices Interest Group. In addition, she served as the Chair of the Eurasian Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Initiative. 

 {Photo credit: Dr. Sherifah Ibrahim/MSH}Trained community drug distributors administer preventative treatment for malaria to children under five living in a camp for internally displaced persons in Zamfara State, Nigeria.Photo credit: Dr. Sherifah Ibrahim/MSH

Anka, a rural community in northern Nigeria, is home to people displaced by violence and conflict in the state of Zamfara. A nutrition crisis looms large and the rain was a welcome relief this year, as displaced persons and villagers were able to produce their food. However, this respite is dampened by the swarms of mosquitoes that breed in water ponds and farmlands and bring malaria—an unwelcome prospect for all, especially for children under 5 who are already undernourished.

 {Photo credit: Raian Amzad/MSH}A client picks up a prescription at a private-sector drug shop in Dhaka, Bangladesh.Photo credit: Raian Amzad/MSH

In Bangladesh, private neighborhood drug sellers are the first point of care for 70% of the population. When the COVID-19 pandemic hit and the country went into lockdown, the people of Bangladesh depended even more on the safe delivery of products and services from local accredited drug sellers. Despite all odds, they kept their shops open safely.The Better Health Bangladesh project (BHB), funded by the U.K.’s Foreign, Commonwealth and Development office, has been supporting Bangladesh’s Directorate General of Drug Administration since 2018 to accredit these private-sector drug sellers in 32 districts. MSH, which leads the project, began supporting private drug seller accreditation in Tanzania in 2003. The model has since been adopted in a number of countries in Africa and Asia. The medicine vendors receive assessments and training in pharmaceutical practices, such as accurate dispensing, counselling, and other pharmaceutical services. In the first phase of the project, through December 2020, BHB accredited 2,193 retail medicine shops against a target 2,500 (88%).

 {Photo credit: MSH staff}Internal displaced people being screened for TB, COVID-19, and HIV in 1 of the 10 centers for internally displaced people in Mekelle, Tigray.Photo credit: MSH staff

The major conflict in Ethiopia’s Tigray region is affecting the functionality of the region’s health system, impacting everything from human resources to infrastructure. TB services are no exception. TB client follow-up has been disrupted, and many facilities have been damaged, including laboratory diagnostic equipment like microscopes and GeneXpert machines. The capacity to ensure service continuity and collect monitoring and evaluation data has been compromised.

Women wait to receive services outside a health center in Tanzania. Photo Credit: Brooke Huskey/MSH

In January 2020, the Tanzania Ministry of Health, Community Development, Gender, Elderly, and Children (MoHCDGEC), in collaboration with the World Health Organization and the Technical Support Services Project (TSSP), identified the need for a national health cross-cutting dashboard that would allow for more efficient reporting from the District Health Information Software 2 (DHIS-2), which is the national health information data repository. We spoke with Isaelly Nagunwa, Strategic Information Advisor, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) TSSP, and Claud John Kumalija, MoHCDGEC Head

A Jinja Regional Referral Hospital staff member receives redistributed TB medicines from Lira Regional Referral Hospital.Photo credit: Benjamin Atwine/MSH

Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is a critical public health problem in Uganda, where the prevalence of MDR-TB in 2015 was an estimated 1.6% among newly diagnosed TB cases and 12% among previously treated TB cases. Uninterrupted access to treatment is necessary to prevent a more serious form of MDR-TB, ensure that the treatment works, and help prevent drug resistance. However, the months-long treatment, plus side effects such as nausea and vomiting, causes some patients to abandon the regimen.

 The USAID SAFEMed Activity in Ukraine launched an innovative public private partnership to improve the distribution of antiretrovirals for HIV and TB medications.

The rates of HIV and TB in Ukraine are high, yet some regions lack access to enough medicines for these and other conditions. The country has the second-largest HIV epidemic in Eastern Europe and Central Asia. Tuberculosis, which is the leading cause of death among infectious diseases in Ukraine, is especially dangerous due to the high estimated number of patients with multidrug-resistant TB.

 {Photo credit: Dr. Stanley Ugah}Mrs. Folake Ajayi takes her IPTp while being observed by health care workers during ANC at PHC Oniyanrin.Photo credit: Dr. Stanley Ugah

Malaria is common among pregnant women in Oyo State, Nigeria, which increases the risk of maternal anemia, low birth weight, premature delivery, stillbirth, and death of infants. Although intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy (IPTp) helps prevent these adverse effects for pregnant women and their unborn children, its uptake in the state is poor. Indeed, IPTp uptake across health facilities in Oyo State was less than 50% from April 2019 to February 2020, when the U.S President’s Malaria Initiative for States (PMI-S) project started supporting the state.

Do you have a bold idea on how to help the people of Uganda have more access to affordable, quality, essential, medicines and health supplies? If so, submit your idea(s) to Uganda’s first-ever Health Supply Chain Solutions Challenge, hosted by the newly launched Supply Chain Innovation Lab. Winners will work with our team of experts in Uganda’s supply chain innovation community to turn your idea into action. 

A health care worker counsels pregnant women on the importance of preventing malaria during pregnancy in Ishelu, Ebonyi State, Nigeria. Photo credit: Oluwatobiloba Akerele/MSH

An estimated 76 percent of Nigeria’s population are at risk of malaria by living in high transmission areas.  Nigeria accounts for 27 percent of malaria cases worldwide and the highest number of deaths (24 percent) due to malaria in 2019 (World Malaria Report, 2020).  The U.S. President's Malaria Initiative for States (PMI-S) activity managed by USAID recognizes that “it takes a village” to achieve a malaria-free Nigeria. PMI-S is implemented in eight states -- Akwa Ibom, Benue, Cross River, Ebonyi,  Nasarawa, Oyo, Plateau, and Zamfara -- and works with health officials at all levels to improve quality and access to services, as well as reduce under-five and maternal mortality.  Here are five ways USAID is making a difference in Nigeria through PMI-S.

Pages