Pharmaceutical Management: Our Impact

Nancy Ngum and Paul Tanui (AUDA-NEPAD), Ms. Mimi Darko (Ghana FDA), and Kate Kikule (MTaPS)

Regional regulatory leaders, representatives from academia, and development organizations gathered in Accra, Ghana, in June to review a new monitoring and evaluation (M&E) tool that promises to improve access to safe, affordable medicines in several African countries by measuring the performance of Regional Centres of Regulatory Excellence (RCOREs).The African Union Development Agency (AUDA-NEPAD), in collaboration with the USAID-funded Medicines, Technologies, and Pharmaceutical Services (MTaPS) program, supported the validation of the M&E tool.

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman}Photo credit: Warren Zelman

What is the purpose of the USAID-funded Medicines, Technologies, and Pharmaceuticals Services (MTaPS) program, and what will the program accomplish?MTaPS recently published a collection of brief publications that provide information on the program’s objectives and planned activities.

 {Photo credit: Igor Dashevskiy}Deputy Minister of Health, Dr Roman Illyk, presents during the National Health Technology Assessment Forum in Kyiv, Ukraine.Photo credit: Igor Dashevskiy

A health technology assessment (HTA) is an evidence-based instrument to identify which medicines, medical devices, and treatment regimens are optimal for the state to support. It significantly reduces opportunities for corruption and helps countries move toward self-reliance in the health sector. A National Health Technology Assessment Forum took place in Kyiv, Ukraine, on February 28, 2019, to further advance HTA as an important priority-setting tool for Ukraine’s health system. Photo credit: Igor Dashevskiy

Principal Dispenser and MTC Secretary, David Ouma in the Moroto regional referral hospital medicines stores

Malaria is the leading cause of outpatient visits in Uganda (Ministry of Health, Annual Health Sector Performance Report, 2015/2016), and prevention, diagnosis, and treatment are crucial for reducing preventable deaths, lowering the risk of resistance to antimalarial medicines, and decreasing medicine wastage and misuse. 

On May 21, during the 71st World Health Assembly, member states adopted a new digital health resolution. It urges member states to better utilize digital technologies as a means of promoting equitable, affordable universal health coverage (UHC), including reaching vulnerable populations. The resolution also calls on members to analyze the implications of digital health to achieve health related sustainable development goals.

Photo: From left: Johnnie Amenyah of JSI, Gladys Tetteh, Francis Aboagye-Nyame, Dinah Tjipura, and Kwesi Eghan of the SIAPS Program attending the End-of-Program event on March 1, 2018 in Arlington, VA. (Santita Ngo/MSH) On Thursday, March 1, 2018, MSH held an end-of-program event for the USAID-funded Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) program.

{Photo Credit: Liza Talukder}Jahidul Hasan works on the adverse drug event report.Photo Credit: Liza Talukder

The Directorate General of Drug Administration (DGDA)—with technical assistance from the USAID-funded SIAPS program, implemented by MSH—officially launched Bangladesh’s national pharmacovigilance (PV) program in 2013. After being first introduced at 20 private and public hospitals, and 13 pharmaceutical companies, the DGDA and SIAPS have organized trainings for focal persons to build their skills and knowledge on PV and increase adverse drug event (ADE) reporting.

{Photo Credit: Wezi Tjaronda}Olavi Shomongula shares his testimony with U.S. Ambassador to Namibia Thomas F. Daughton.Photo Credit: Wezi Tjaronda

A new electronic health tool developed by the USAID-funded Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) program, implemented byMSH, is being used in more than 50 public health facilities in Namibia. This tool—the Facility Electronic Stock Card (FESC)—has noticeably expedited the dispensing of medication to patients. This was evident when the US Ambassador to Namibia H.E. Thomas F. Daughton visited the Intermediate Hospital Oshakati (IHO), which is in the populous Oshana region in the North-Central part of Namibia.

{Photo Credit: Henry Nyaka}Grace Mathunda.Photo Credit: Henry Nyaka

At the time that Grace Mathunda started to fall ill, she also grew increasingly concerned over the poor health of her second child. Eventually he became so weak that he stopped going to school. When Mathunda, 32, became pregnant again, she went to Makhetha Health Center in Blantyre, Malawi, where she was tested for HIV. As with over 30 percent of people living with HIV in the country, Mathunda was unaware of her status.[1] She tested positive.

{Photo credit: Sarah Lagot}H.E. Deborah Malac, US Ambassador to Uganda, delivers motorbikes to Hon. Dr. Jane Ruth Aceng, Minister of Health, to support the implementation of the USAID/Uganda Health Supply Chain program’s Supervision Performance Assessment Recognition Strategy.Photo credit: Sarah Lagot

On November 29, 2017, the US Government donated motorcycles and laptop computers to Uganda’s Ministry of Health as part of its ongoing effort to strengthen the health commodity supply chain system and improve the health of Ugandans. The donation was made possible by the generous support of the American people through USAID’s Uganda Health Supply Chain (UHSC) program, implemented by Management Sciences for Health. 

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