Tuberculosis: Our Impact

Unable to work, Rasel worried about how his family would survive while he went through treatment for drug-resistant TB.Photo credit: Challenge TB Bangladesh

Bangladesh is a global hotspot for TB, and the country’s government and its partners are hard at work to find and treat missing cases of TB and prevent the spread of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). The available treatment for MDR-TB is expensive, lengthy, and complex, and the disease is often considered a death sentence.

One of the first patients in Bangladesh to receive the shorter treatment regimen, Billal survived multi-drug resistant TB and returned to his life and his family.Photo credit: Challenge TB Bangladesh

Living with TB is very hard, and living with drug-resistant TB (DR-TB) is even worse. The drugs needed to treat DR-TB are not only toxic but also very expensive, and treatment can take as long as two years to complete. In April 2017, with the support of USAID’s Challenge TB (CTB) project, Bangladesh started its first patients on a shorter treatment regimen for DR-TB.

Left to right: Dr. Daniel Gemechu, Regional Director for CTB/Ethiopia , Dr. Ahmed Bedru, Country Director for CTB/Ethiopia , Mr. Taye Letta, National TB Program Manager, Dr. Liya Tadesse, State Minister of Health, Dr. Kitty van Weezenbeek, Executive Director of KNCV and Dr. Pedro Suarez, Senior Director, Infectious Disease Cluster at MSH.

At last week’s end of project ceremony, the USAID-funded Challenge TB project celebrated improvements in Ethiopia’s ability to save lives by detecting, diagnosing, and treating TB more effectively.Under this five-year program, USAID invested $42 million to improve the quality of TB care and prevention services, enabling patients to receive better access to treatment and medication to fight the disease. TB deaths have dropped significantly as treatment success rates rose above 90%, with 75% of those suffering from multidrug-resistant TB now able to beat the disease after comple

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman}Photo credit: Warren Zelman

What is the purpose of the USAID-funded Medicines, Technologies, and Pharmaceuticals Services (MTaPS) program, and what will the program accomplish?MTaPS recently published a collection of brief publications that provide information on the program’s objectives and planned activities.

Tuberculosis remains the world’s leading infectious disease killer, claiming 4,500 lives each day. Every year, some 558,000 people will develop a form of TB that is resistant to rifampicin, the most effective first-line drug, making successful treatment of the disease even more difficult and costly. Ending the global epidemic requires a comprehensive approach, rapid innovation and proven interventions, bold leadership, and intensive community engagement.

This story was originally published on systemone.id. SystemOne LLC, (Springfield, MA), Management Sciences for Health (MSH) (Medford, MA) and the Tableau Foundation (Seattle, WA) recently concluded the first Data Fellowship Program for TB staff from the National TB programs and Ministries of Health. Eight participants from five participating countries attended the week-long training session in Johannesburg, using their own country’s GxAlert diagnostic data to uncover ways to improve healthcare delivery and patient impact.

 {Photo Credit: Rhiana Smith}Aziz Abdallah, DHSS Project Director, MSH, greets guests at end-of-project eventPhoto Credit: Rhiana Smith

The District Health System Strengthening and Quality Improvement for Service Delivery (DHSS) Project shared its achievements on Wednesday, March 7, after five years of work to reduce the burden of HIV/AIDS in Malawi. Guests gathered at the Bingu International Conference Center in Malawi’s capital, Lilongwe, for an end-of-project event that featured speakers from DHSS, the Ministry of Health, United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and Management Sciences for Health (MSH), which led the DHSS Project,  

Photo: From left: Johnnie Amenyah of JSI, Gladys Tetteh, Francis Aboagye-Nyame, Dinah Tjipura, and Kwesi Eghan of the SIAPS Program attending the End-of-Program event on March 1, 2018 in Arlington, VA. (Santita Ngo/MSH) On Thursday, March 1, 2018, MSH held an end-of-program event for the USAID-funded Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) program.

{Photo Credit: Health for All Project Staff}Photo Credit: Health for All Project Staff

From January 30 to February 7, 2018, Angola’s Health for All (HFA) Project, supported by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), welcomed global health expert, Dr. Alaine Nyaruhirira, for a week-long training on the use of GeneXpert – technology that has become a game-changer in the fight against tuberculosis (TB).

{Photo Credit: Sarah Lagot/MSH}TRACK TB's Chief of Party, Dr. Raymond Byaruhanga takes the Lira Hospital staff on a tour of the newly constructed MDR TB ward.Photo Credit: Sarah Lagot/MSH

According to guidelines set by the World Health Organization, the management of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) requires patients to be hospitalized for a short period of time before being released to seek daily treatment from a nearby health facility. Despite this requirement, the Lira and Soroti regional hospitals in Uganda both lacked admission facilities suitable for the treatment of MDR-TB.

Pages