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This technical brief makes the case for understanding behavior change approaches as necessary but insufficient methods of HIV prevention. The document describes how behavior change interventions may be more effective when they are used as part of a  combination prevention approach that is shaped by a social-ecological perspective on HIV prevention.

In 2007, WHO/UNAIDS recommended that male circumcision be considered an important new intervention for HIV prevention, and that countries with a high HIV prevalence, low rates of male circumcision, and heterosexual epidemics should consider scaling up male circumcision as part of a comprehensive HIV prevention package.

We need a dramatic change in thinking—and action from donors, policymakers, and program managers in the public, private, and nongovernmental (NGO) sectors—to focus on strengthening health systems in the countries most affected by HIV & AIDS. To meet the Millennium Development Goal of reversing the epidemic by 2015, we must change how we design and deliver services.

These guidelines provide standards for HIV prevention program implementation for non-governmental organizations and civil society organizations, against which services provided to the target populations can be monitored and evaluated to ensure quality and client satisfaction.

INSIDE STORY tells the story of Kalu, a rising Kenyan footballer, who moves from rural Kenya to urban Johannesburg to follow his dream and support his family. His path becomes more challenging when he falls in love with the coach’s daughter Ify and subsequently finds out he is HIV-positive.

Mobile health (mHealth) is the provision of health services and information via mobile and wireless technologies. The mobile phone has become ubiquitous in Africa, making mHealth an important tool with which to impact the health of Africans. When applied correctly, mHealth can make real contributions to improved health outcomes. 

Nigeria is home to 17.5 million orphans and vulnerable children (OVC). According to the Federal Ministry of Women Affairs and Social Development, one in every four children in Nigeria is considered vulnerable due to unmet needs for nutrition, education, shelter, care, or support. The Need for New Solutions

Nigeria is home to 17.5 million children who are considered vulnerable due to unmet needs for food, shelter, education, protection, or care With 3.4 million citizens living with HIV & AIDS, Nigeria has the second highest HIV burden in the world.

Nigeria is home to 17.5 million orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) who struggle daily to access food, shelter, education, protection, and care.

In Nigeria, as in most countries, women and girls assume the bulk of the caregiving burden for those infected with HIV and children left vulnerable or orphaned by AIDS. These responsibilities often prevent girls and women from obtaining an education and developing income-generating skills.

In recent years, there has been a shift in how the international community is addressing the HIV epidemic. As more people are receiving antiretroviral therapy, we are seeing the benefits of reduced viral load on a population level. Fewer babies are being born HIV positive and prevalence rates are dropping in most countries with the highest HIV burdens.

Ethiopia’s Federal Ministry of Health (FMOH) began integrating mother mentors with a Mother Support Group (MSG) into national HIV programing in 2005 to address the special needs of HIV-positive pregnant and postpartum women and their children.

This report reviews the role of mother mentors and their Mother Support Groups (MSGs) in supporting HIV-positive mothers to live healthy lives and use appropriate health services.

Strengthening health systems is the core of management Sciences for Health’s response to the HIV epidemic. We build the capacity of the public and private sector in more than 35 countries to prevent, treat, and manage HIV & AIDS.

In response to the HIV and tuberculosis (TB) epidemics, we build the capacity of our public- and private-sector partners to prevent TB and HIV and improve diagnosis and management of co-infected patients.

Ten years ago, in 2004, testing positive for HIV in Ethiopia was a death sentence. It was the start of a painful decline, including illness and ostracism from society, ultimately leading to premature death.

The Ethiopia Network for HIV/AIDS Treatment, Care, & Support (ENHAT-CS) program, a USAID initiative funded by PEPFAR. was an MSH-led consortium of national and international partners.

Background In Ethiopia, over 60% of all people who are eligible for antiretroviral therapy (ART) receive it. However, coverage is only 12% among children under 15 years of age. Due to scarcity of data and limited awareness of possible HIV infection, especially in older children, the AIDS epidemic among Ethiopian children appears neglected in national programs. Methods

In Ethiopia, male-dominated gender dynamics and health care provider attitudes lead many women to avoid or not fully utilize antenatal care (ANC) and prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) services, creating barriers to women’s access to care and to interrupting vertical transmission of HIV.

Following the World Health Organization’s 2013 guidelines endorsing antiretroviral therapy for all HIV-infected pregnant women, Ethiopia adopted Option B+ (initiation of triple regimen antiretroviral therapy (ART) for the duration of breastfeeding or for life regardless of a pregnant woman’s CD4 count) as the national standard for prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT

Ethiopia’s HIV prevalence rate is approximately 1.2 percent,2 equating to about 700,000 HIV-infected people. Since 2005, Ethiopia has been decentralizing free antiretroviral (ART) services from hospitals to health centers as a strategy to improve access to HIV care and treatment.

Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV and Early Infant Diagnosis:The Global Situation

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