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Challenge TB was implemented in Ethiopia as part of Management Sciences for Health’s (MSH’s) Innovation Challenge Fund (INCH)2 initiative designed to encourage innovative interventions across MSH supported projects. MSH used the ExpandNet Framework3 to scale up the innovation.

Since adopting Option B+ in 2011, Malawi has made significant progress in identifying and treating pregnant women living with HIV, thereby reducing vertical transmission. During the same time period, follow-up, diagnosis, and care of babies born to HIV-infected mothers also improved.

Malawi has a population of 18 million, with an adult HIV prevalence of 10.6%. The country has made remarkable progress toward achieving the UNAIDS 90-90-90 goals, achieving the first goal remains a challenge. The Malawi HIV program estimated Malawi’s progress on achieving the 90-90-90 goals at 88-78-86 by June 2017.

Malawi adopted the 90-90-90 strategy as part of the National Strategic Plan to end HIV/AIDS by 2030 which calls for: identifying 90% of people living with HIV (PLHIV); initiating and retaining on antiretroviral therapy (ART) 90% of PLHIV identified; and achieving 90% viral suppression for ART patients.

Malawi is among the countries hardest hit by the HIV pandemic. The country has a national HIV prevalence rate of 10.6% of the adult population aged 15–64 years (12.8% women vs 8.2% in men). With 85% of Malawians living in rural areas, access to health services is difficult because of long distances, poverty, and other social factors.

HIV has been a global challenge over the past several decades, particularly in developing countries such as Malawi, where adult HIV prevalence is about 10.6%.

Malawi has a significant youth and adolescent population, with nearly two-thirds of the country’s estimated 17.2 million people under the age of 24. Youth and adolescents, aged 10-24, account for about 50% of new HIV infections in Malawi.

Cervical cancer affects an estimated 527,624 women worldwide each year, killing more than half of them. About 85% of the global disease burden occurs in developing countries, and Southern Africa is one of the highest-risk regions in the world.

There are more than one million Malawians (HIV prevalence of 10.6%) living with HIV. Nearly 85% of people live in rural or hard-to-reach areas of the country and the sparsely located health facilities are unable to meet their needs.

In 2011, Malawi pioneered an ambitious test-and-treat approach for pregnant and breastfeeding women, known as Option B+. Under this strategy, all HIV-infected pregnant and breastfeeding women are provided with lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART) regardless of their CD4 count or clinical stage.

The Integrated Health Project Plus (IHPplus) was implemented in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) from June 2015 to June 2018 by Management Sciences for Health (MSH) and Overseas Strategic Consulting, Ltd. (OSC), under a subcontract via Pathfinder/Evidence to Action.

Unique identification is essential to progress toward meeting PEPFAR’s 95-95-95 goal. For people living with HIV, better program management means more timely testing and promotes continuity of service for lifesaving sustained ART. Providers can assess treatment regimens and their effectiveness toward achieving viral suppression.

The TRACK TB project’s goal was to increase the case detection rate (CDR) and the treatment success rate (TSR) in focus areas to meet national targets for reducing the burden of TB, MDR-TB, and TB/HIV.

Despite making good progress toward digitizing client level data, the Government of Tanzania is still working to meet the latest global guidelines for HIV/AIDS programs. One major reason is that the country’s data collection and HIS do not efficiently deliver the quality information required for effective monitoring and planning.

The Technical Support Services Project (TSSP) worked with the Tanzania Ministry of Health, Community Development, Gender, the Elderly, and Children (MoHCDGEC) to support and strengthen the Star Rating Assessment (SRA) Tool system. The project integrated HIV/AIDS indicators into the tool to create more comprehensive assessments of the country’s health care facilities. 

The dual burden of TB and HIV infection has prompted global attention as well as WHO policies and guidelines.

Ethiopia is among high TB-HIV burden countries and uptake of live-saving treatment among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) has remained low at the national level.

The Tanzania Technical Support Services Project (TSSP) supports the Ministry of Health, Community Development, Gender, Elderly, and Children (MoHCDGEC) and public health institutions in improving the health system to achieve and sustain HIV epidemic control in Tanzania.

In support of the government of Angola's efforts to maintain the country’s relatively low HIV prevalence, MSH, under USAID Angola’s Health For All (HFA) Project (2017–2019) helped to establish a sustainable model for providing high-quality HIV and AIDS services through the prevention, care, and treatment continuum.To accelerate early HIV diagnosis and linkage to care, HFA support

To accelerate progress in early diagnosis and linkage to treatment of people living with HIV, the Health For All (HFA) Project in Angola trained and deployed 16 patient assistant facilitators (PAFs) across seven health facilities in Luanda.In support of the Government of Angola’s (GoA) strategic plan to accelerate early diagnosis of HIV, HFA supported initiatives to ensure that people living

Until recently, TB and HIV have been treated separately under Angola’s National TB Control Program (NCTB) and the National Institute for the Fight Against AIDS (INLS).In support of TB/HIV service integration, the Health for All (HFA) project provided coordination and advocacy at the national level to align NCTB and INLS goals, infrastructural support to facilities to ensure that they have th

The Health For All (HFA) Project worked in partnership with the Government of Angola to integrate provider-initiated HIV testing services into family planning services in health facilities. To support the integration of FP and HIV services, HFA developed standard operating procedures (SOPs) based on each clinical intervention, job aids, and checklists and provided training to health prov

The Health for All (HFA) Project (April 2017– September 2019) was funded by USAID, led by Population Services International, and implemented in partnership with Management Sciences for Health (MSH) and local partners Rede de Mulheres Angolanas and the MENTOR Initiative. MSH led implementation of the project’s work on HIV and AIDS at seven health facilities selected by the US Presi

HFA works in support of the Government of Angola’s strategic plan to accelerate early HIV diagnosis and linkage to care through implementation of the Busca Activa Consentida Através do Caso Indice (BACCI) or index case testing and tracing (ICTT).

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