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To treat infections in newborns and young infants (age 0 to 59 days), WHO recommends transferring them to a hospital and administering a regimen combining two injectable antibiotics, namely, penicillin or ampicillin, plus gentamicin for seven to ten days.

Strengthening information systems to support health data use is a critical component of quality improvement. In the past, research on quality of care has focused on the availability of resources and implementation of clinical guidelines, while often ignoring the regular metrics and monitoring systems used to inform decision making and manage improvement initiatives.

Bangladesh is one of the world’s high tuberculosis (TB) burden countries. According to World Health Organization’s 2017 Global TB Report, 38% of drug-sensitive and approximately 84% of drug-resistant patients are undiagnosed or unreported. The most infectious TB patients are these missing cases.

GxAlert is a web-based open-source data connectivity application that includes a system for data management designed to work with any diagnostic device that can connect to the internet or a mobile network.

Ethiopia is one of the most populous countries in Africa with a high TB burden across a wide geography. The national TB program has reached hundreds of thousands of cases and successfully treated them. However, health authorities believe that a third of cases have been missed in the community, development corridors, industries, and crowded settings, such as universities.

Blended learning is an approach that combines independent reading with short off-site training. Management Sciences for Health (MSH), under the guidance of the Ethiopia National TB Program and in partnership with the All-Africa Leprosy, Tuberculosis and Rehabilitation Training Center (ALERT), pioneered a blended learning approach for TB training in Ethiopia.

 Photo credit: Mark TuschmanVersion en français disponible à la suite de la version en anglais.REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS:  Small Grants Mechanism to Support Civil Society Engagement, Alignment, and Coordinated Action for Improved Women’s, Children’s, and Adolescents’ Health, Particularly in Relation to the Global Financing FacilityManagement Sciences for

Mobile applications play an important role in field data collection in developing countries. However, poor infrastructure remains a challenge to fully utilizing mobile services. e-TB Manager, an electronic tuberculosis (TB) management system, is a web-based tool used to manage all TB-related data and information needed by national TB control programs.

The National TB Programme (NTP) in Ethiopia is committed to decentralizing and scaling up implementation of drug resistant TB (DR-TB) management by using an alternative ambulatory model to increase access to care. Challenge TB in collaboration with the NTP supported the implementation of programmatic management of DR-TB (PMDT) across the country by expanding treatment initiating centers (TICs

Contact investigation (CI) refers to the systematic evaluation of individuals who have been in close contact with potentially infectious TB cases within three months of TB treatment initiation. In Ethiopia, the USAID-funded HEAL TB and Challenge TB projects implemented three CI approaches: routine or prospective, reverse, and retrospective.

Many women in low and middle-income countries face gaps in access to high-quality ANC: they often do not receive the recommended services for a healthy pregnancy, experience poor quality of care, and are treated disrespectfully. 

In Nigeria, tuberculosis (TB) is a major public health problem and low case finding remains a challenge to its eradication. The USAID-funded Challenge TB project supports GeneXpert sites across the country. However sub-optimal GeneXpert utilization due to modular failures, power supply issues, and inadequate samples has contributed to low TB case finding.

In collaboration with the USAID-funded Rwanda Health Systems Strengthening Project and partners, Rwanda’s Ministry of Health introduced the Workload Indicator of Staffing Needs (WISN) tool in all public district and provincial hospitals in the country.

The Rwanda Medical Procedure Coding (RMPC) system was developed by Rwanda’s Ministry of Health, with technical assistance from the USAID-funded Rwanda Health Systems Strengthening Project, to harmonize procedure coding with an international standard.

A key challenge identified by a study on health sector staff retention, conducted by the USAID-funded Rwanda Health Systems Strengthening Project in 2017, was the lack of access to credit at a reasonable interest rate from commercial banks for building a home, purchasing essential items or meeting emergency expenses.

In collaboration with the Ministry of Health and other health sector stakeholders, the USAID-funded Rwanda Health Systems Strengthening Project conducted many interventions aimed at improving the performance of the health system at all levels.

Launched and administered with support from the USAID Rwanda Health Systems Strengthening Project, the District Operational Research Challenge Fund aims to build and grow the capacity of MOH’s district hospital staff and young health researchers to conduct research and implement sustainable public health programs.

In 2000, the Government of Rwanda decentralized health and other services to the district level. After nearly two decades of progressively taking on responsibilities for the health sector, district leaders are demonstrating stronger ownership of health initiatives.

In Rwanda, the Ministry of Health has committed to providing universal access to health services and improving the quality of care. An important factor that impacts quality and access to care is the amount of time patients wait to see providers at health facilities.

One of the most successful interventions designed to provide universal health coverage to the citizens of Rwanda has been the establishment of the Community Based Health Insurance (CBHI) Scheme. This provides a basic package of primary care and referral services through a wide network public and some private health facilities at an affordable cost for those who can pay.

TB infection prevention and control (IPC) is an important strategy to prevent disease transmission—it is a combination of measures to minimize the risk of transmission from a TB case to other patients, health care providers, and the wider population.

Bangladesh is one of the world’s high MDR-TB burden countries. According to the WHO, the MDR-TB burden is 1.6% among new cases and 29% among retreatment cases. The longer duration of MDR-TB treatment regimens and the toxicity of certain agents discourage many patients from completing treatment.

In collaboration with the National TB Control Program (NTP) in Bangladesh, the USAID-funded Challenge TB established a high-quality Bio-Safety Level-3 Laboratory (BSL-3 lab) in Sylhet to accelerate TB and DR-TB diagnosis and treatment in the northeast region of the country. The BSL-3 lab, the highest level of safety of its type in Bangladesh, provides rapid and quality services.

Tuberculosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among children. In Ethiopia, more than 15,000 pediatric, drug-sensitive TB cases were reported in 2017 and 2018. Until recently there were no appropriately dosed TB medicines for children.

Achieving the best health outcomes possible requires a well-trained, adequately staffed, equitably distributed, and highly motivated workforce to provide services, especially in challenging circumstances.However, many health facilities in rural and hard-to-reach areas of Kenya lack enough staff to meet the surrounding population’s health care needs. Recognizing the need to est

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