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The Rwanda Medical Procedure Coding (RMPC) system was developed by Rwanda’s Ministry of Health, with technical assistance from the USAID-funded Rwanda Health Systems Strengthening Project, to harmonize procedure coding with an international standard.

A key challenge identified by a study on health sector staff retention, conducted by the USAID-funded Rwanda Health Systems Strengthening Project in 2017, was the lack of access to credit at a reasonable interest rate from commercial banks for building a home, purchasing essential items or meeting emergency expenses.

In collaboration with the Ministry of Health and other health sector stakeholders, the USAID-funded Rwanda Health Systems Strengthening Project conducted many interventions aimed at improving the performance of the health system at all levels.

Launched and administered with support from the USAID Rwanda Health Systems Strengthening Project, the District Operational Research Challenge Fund aims to build and grow the capacity of MOH’s district hospital staff and young health researchers to conduct research and implement sustainable public health programs.

In 2000, the Government of Rwanda decentralized health and other services to the district level. After nearly two decades of progressively taking on responsibilities for the health sector, district leaders are demonstrating stronger ownership of health initiatives.

In Rwanda, the Ministry of Health has committed to providing universal access to health services and improving the quality of care. An important factor that impacts quality and access to care is the amount of time patients wait to see providers at health facilities.

One of the most successful interventions designed to provide universal health coverage to the citizens of Rwanda has been the establishment of the Community Based Health Insurance (CBHI) Scheme. This provides a basic package of primary care and referral services through a wide network public and some private health facilities at an affordable cost for those who can pay.

TB infection prevention and control (IPC) is an important strategy to prevent disease transmission—it is a combination of measures to minimize the risk of transmission from a TB case to other patients, health care providers, and the wider population.

Bangladesh is one of the world’s high MDR-TB burden countries. According to the WHO, the MDR-TB burden is 1.6% among new cases and 29% among retreatment cases. The longer duration of MDR-TB treatment regimens and the toxicity of certain agents discourage many patients from completing treatment.

In collaboration with the National TB Control Program (NTP) in Bangladesh, the USAID-funded Challenge TB established a high-quality Bio-Safety Level-3 Laboratory (BSL-3 lab) in Sylhet to accelerate TB and DR-TB diagnosis and treatment in the northeast region of the country. The BSL-3 lab, the highest level of safety of its type in Bangladesh, provides rapid and quality services.

Tuberculosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among children. In Ethiopia, more than 15,000 pediatric, drug-sensitive TB cases were reported in 2017 and 2018. Until recently there were no appropriately dosed TB medicines for children.

Achieving the best health outcomes possible requires a well-trained, adequately staffed, equitably distributed, and highly motivated workforce to provide services, especially in challenging circumstances.However, many health facilities in rural and hard-to-reach areas of Kenya lack enough staff to meet the surrounding population’s health care needs. Recognizing the need to est

The primary mode for the spread of TB is person to person, and it is estimated that a person with TB can infect up to 15 individuals each year until that patient starts treatment and is rendered non-infectious. The USAID-funded Challenge TB project implemented a demonstration initiative that provided preventive treatment for household contacts of TB patients.

The USAID-funded Challenge TB project collaborated with the Ethiopian National TB Control Program (NTP) and regional health bureaus to integrate TB screening into all health service outlets across the country. The intensive support included mentorship of hospital staff by zonal and regional teams, routine check-ins, on-site capacity building, and close follow-up.

Previously, Ethiopia used conventional methods for mycobacteria culture and drug susceptibility testing, which take 4-12 weeks to get results and require sequential procedures for the diagnosis. The recently introduced second-line probe assay (SL-LPA) delivers results in just 24-48 hours, a vast improvement over the conventional method.

The Ethiopian National TB Program (NTP) has made important contributions to the decentralization of multidrug-resistant (MDR) treatment and follow-up sites across the country.

The Technical Support Services Project (TSSP) worked with the Tanzania Ministry of Health, Community Development, Gender, Elderly, and Children (MoHCDGEC) to analyze data to project future health care employment needs, including current and future vacancies, and create a five-year recruitment and staffing plan.

The Leadership Development Program (LDP+) is an experiential approach developed by Management Sciences for Health (MSH). The program enables individuals at all levels of an organization to develop the skills they need to lead, manage, and govern programs; meet challenges; and achieve measurable desired results.

Afghanistan accounts for two-thirds of the global area under opium poppy cultivation and produces 70 percent of the world’s opiates.

In 2014, the Government of Angola introduced a national community development and health worker program to address challenges affecting the poor.

To address the high burden of TB in the Philippines, the National TB Control Program (NTP) of the Department of Health (DOH) is working to ensure access to TB medicines.

One of the key elements of successful tuberculosis (TB) control programs is adherence to treatment, and this is a cornerstone of most international and national policies and guidelines. Non-adherence is often due to patient-related factors, but can also be a result of provider issues, such as stock-outs of TB medicines.

The National TB Control Program (NTP) in the Philippines is continuously scaling up its operations in the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis (TB) to achieve the results and deliverables described in the 2010–2016 Philippine Plan of Action to Control Tuberculosis.

CB DOTS is an approach for engaging communities to support detection and treatment of TB, while also bringing TB services closer to their communities. In Afghanistan, CB DOTS has been implemented in more than 715 health facilities and 15 provinces, and the national Ministry of Public Health is integrating the CB DOTS strategy into the nationwide basic package of health services.

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