Blog Posts by MSHHealthImpact

5thBDay badge in white background.5thBDay badge in white background.

Every child deserves a fifth birthday. It seems simple enough. But for many children in the world — especially in countries with the highest burden of child mortality, such as India, Nigeria, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Pakistan and Ethiopia — preventable deaths will claim their lives, before they reach the age of five.

Today, USAID launched an ongoing child survival awareness campaign, called, “Every Child Deserves a 5th Birthday.”

The “5th Birthday” campaign kicked off with a briefing event at Kaiser Family Foundation, featuring USAID Administrator Dr. Rajiv Shah and other experts. Dr. Shah and colleagues stressed that reducing the burden of child mortality is critical to our future as a global community.

While the global community has made great strides reducing child mortality, inequality in child mortality remains: several regions and countries continue to shoulder the greatest burden and loss of life.

Women and child in Tambura, South Sudan. {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

Nearly 50 countries, including Afghanistan, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Haiti, Liberia and South Sudan, are considered a fragile or conflict-affected state -- a state that is in conflict, recovering from conflict or crisis, or a state that has collapsed or has a strong and repressive government. Over nearly 40 years of working in fragile states, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) has identified best practices, lessons learned, and appropriate interventions for a myriad of situations in fragile states.

MSH takes an integrated approach to building high-impact sustainable public health programs that address critical challenges in leadership, health systems management, health service delivery, human resources, and medicines. Wherever our partnerships succeed, the positive impact of good health has a ripple effect, contributing to the building of healthy nations.

MSH works collaboratively with health care policymakers, managers, providers, and the private sector to increase the efficacy, efficiency, and sustainability of health services by improving management systems, promoting access to services, and influencing public policy.

Meet Okata and his grandmother, watch the video.Meet Okata and his grandmother, watch the video.

On this World Health Day, we invite you to meet Okata, a 3-year-old orphan living with HIV, and his grandmother, his caretaker.

World Health Day, celebrated April 7th, marks the founding of the World Health Organization. This year's theme, "Good health adds life to years," encourages the global community to rethink what it means to be "old".

Watch the video, Building a Stronger Health System in Uganda, and share Okata's story with your network of family and friends.

Sudan Health Transformation Project II (SHTP-II) Chief of Party John Rumunu comments on what independence means for health in South Sudan. SHTP-II is led Management Sciences for Health and funded by USAID.

Discovering MSH blog series graphicOver the next couple of months, as MSH celebrates it's 40th anniversary, reporter John Donnelly and photographer Dominic Chavez will be traveling to several countries to report on MSH’s work in the field. The stories will go into a book due out in the fall on MSH’s 40 years in global health. This blog entry is a post from the road, to give a flavor of their experiences with MSH staff.LILONGWE, Malawi – The problem with writing about improvements in Malawi’s health system is focus. There are multiple directions to explore: extending family planning into rural communities, training HIV counselors, the rapid scale-up of HIV treatment, integrating TB services more into the mainstream of health care. At the US Agency for International Development (USAID) mission here, Dr.

Listen to USAID Deputy Administrator Donald Steinberg and MSH Chief of Party John Rumunu (South Sudan) and MSH Center for Health Services Vice President Diana Silimperi talk about health systems in fragile states.

This teleconference is in conjunction with the health and fragile states conference at US Institute of Peace happening June 9 and 10, co-sponsored by MSH.

Management Sciences for Health (MSH) Press Teleconference on Fragile States and Health, June 8.

Today, the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) released a new video: “Spotlighting the NCD Problem.” This video explains the challenge the world is facing with non-communicable diseases. According to the World Health Organization, about 36 million people die each year due to NCDs, and a quarter of NCD deaths are of people aged under 60; 9 in 10 of these people are from developing countries.

MSH President and CEO Jonathan D. Quick, MD, MPH, recently called on UN member states to take a heath systems strengthening approach to NCDs.

Orou Assoumanou describing the work within his community to Dr. Lola Gandaho, of BASICS Benin.

 

Living in the rural village of Kpagnaroung, Benin, Orou Assoumanou is a dedicated health worker who promoted vaccinations and distributed ivermectin (a medicine used to treat roundworm) within his community before receiving training by the MSH-led, USAID BASICS (Basic Support for Institutionalizing Child Survival) project in community-case management. The comprehensive BASICS training improved his ability to offer care and enabled him to treat children within his community.

With the arrival of a trained community health worker able to prescribe medications, members of his community no longer have to travel long distances to seek medical care for their children. In fact, Orou says that crowds would form at his door to receive care.

 

 

 

 

Pages