Tanzania: Our Impact

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman, Ethiopia.}Photo credit: Warren Zelman, Ethiopia.

For more than eight years, the Supply Chain Management System (SCMS) has been saving lives through stronger supply chains. Funded by the US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), SCMS is supporting rapid scale-up of HIV/AIDS programs, creating a reliable global supply chain where none existed, leveraging economies of scale to reduce costs, and serving as an emergency provider of choice for AIDS programs. SCMS is managed by the non-profit Partnership for Supply Chain Management (PFSCM)—a partnership of John Snow, Inc. (JSI), and Management Sciences for Health (MSH).

 {Photo credit: TZ-ICB Library.}Business Planning for Health participants in Zanzibar, June 2013.Photo credit: TZ-ICB Library.

Resource mobilization has been a challenge for Tanzania’s National Health Laboratory (NHL).

{Photo credit: MSH}Photo credit: MSH

Management Sciences for Health—with financial support from The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, USAID and other partners—has been working in Tanzania on scaling up the Accredited Drug Dispensing Outlets (ADDO) Program since 2002, in support of the Government of Tanzania's efforts to improve access to essential medicines and pharmaceutical services.

 {Photo credit: Rui Pires}Accredited drug shop (ADS) in Uganda.Photo credit: Rui Pires

The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that nearly one-third of the developing world population lacks regular access to quality essential medicines. In rural areas of sub-Saharan Africa, most people first turn to community drug shops for their medicines; yet these shops may not be legally licensed, have trained staff, or sell quality-assured medicines. Committed to Expanding Access to Quality Essential Medicines 

The USAID-funded Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) Program, led by Management Sciences for Health, in collaboration with the World Health Organization (WHO) and Stop TB partners, is co-hosting the 2nd Africa Tuberculosis (TB) Regional Conference on Management of TB Medicines in Zanzibar, Tanzania, from December 5 – 7, 2012.The Africa regional TB conference focuses on identifying and prioritizing country specific challenges for the management of TB medicines.

Dr. Eliud Wandwalo. {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

MSH works with international, national, and local partners to strengthen the capacity of health systems, national tuberculosis (TB) programs, and health managers to improve the lives of those affected by TB and prevent the spread of the disease. MSH participates in several global TB initiatives, including USAID’s Tuberculosis CARE I Program (following the TB CAP program); the STOP TB Partnership; and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria.

Tanzanian Health Market Innovations awardees in Uganda {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

Pharmacies and health care services are not always easily accessible to patients living in developing countries. Many have to walk several miles – if they are able to – just to reach a health care center that can provide them with medicines and treatment.With support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) has been working with local governments (starting in Tanzania) since 2002 to improve access to affordable, quality medicines and pharmaceutical services by developing accredited retail drug shops in such underserved areas.

(New York) Management Sciences for Health (MSH) today announced its $15-million Commitment to Action at the 2011 Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) Annual Meeting, pledging to scale up sustainable accredited drug seller programs in five African nations by 2015 and bring quality essential medicines to 70 million people in rural communities. The program will also positively impact the lives of thousands of female workers—many of the drug shop dispensers (up to 90 percent in some areas) are women—through creation of new business and employment opportunities.

Management Sciences for Health (MSH) has been awarded a three-year, $8.6 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to continue and expand its efforts to develop sustainable solutions enabling private drug sellers, many of them women, to help more people access essential medicines in Africa.

In Tanzania, Accredited Drug Dispensing Outlets (ADDO), private drug dispensers, are increasing access to quality pharmaceutical products and services in under-served, often rural areas of Tanzania through the use of regulation, training, and supervision. The program, through support from the Tanzania Food and Drugs Authority (TFDA), focuses on improving training and dispensing practices at retail outlets and improving regulatory enforcement to assure product quality.

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