Pharmaceutical Management: Our Impact

{Photo credit: MSH}Knud Rhyl was brought on board by SURE and NDA to help devise the new guidelines and inspection tool. Knud helped adapt international best practices to the Ugandan context. He is pictured presenting at the meeting with key wholesalers in Uganda.Photo credit: MSH

In Uganda, although wholesale and retail pharmacies are legally distinct, their practices are indistinguishable and their customer base overlaps. Wholesalers’ service should be business-to-business only, but they often sell to the public. This division of responsibility is crucial in assuring the quality and safety of drugs; without accountability, substandard and counterfeit medicines can too easily slip through the cracks.

 {Photo credit: MSH}District Inspector, Daniel Isabirye, inspecting Misima HC II in Jinja, while Esther Mugadya, the In-charge, helps find stock cards for review.Photo credit: MSH

The National Drug Authority (NDA) has minimum standards and inspects facilities to certify that they meet those standards. Inspections, therefore, are important in ensuring good pharmacy practices. Until now, NDA had only inspected private sector pharmacies who had more resources to achieve what was required to be certified.

 {Photo credit: Aurélie Jousset/MSH}Joseph Borgelain inserts the cartridge into the PIMA machine to perform a rapid CD4 test for Paul.Photo credit: Aurélie Jousset/MSH

Two-year-old Paul had been sick for several days. On October 12, 2013, his aunt Marie brought him to the Jules Fleury Hospital in the Nippes department of Haiti. Two weeks prior, Paul’s mother, who is HIV-positive, had left for Port-au-Prince in search of work, leaving Paul in the care of his aunt.

First established in 1974, the Ethiopian Pharmaceutical Association (EPA) has evolved to become one of the strongest and most exemplary professional associations in Ethiopia. Held up as a model, the EPA is the country’s first professional association to develop continuing professional development guidelines that are used nationwide. Recognizing the EPA’s professional capacity to lead the pharmaceutical sector, Ethiopia’s Ministry of Health has actively engaged the association in formulating the country’s health policy.

MSH's Global Technical Lead for HIV and AIDS, Scott Kellerman, has co-edited a 12-paper special supplement on pediatric HIV and AIDS for the journal AIDS. Dr. Nandita Sugandhi from CHAI and Dr. Rami Yogev from Northwestern University Department of Pediatrics were also co-editors. The series was initiated last year because of concerns that key issues in pediatric HIV and AIDS were being overlooked, such as case findings for children missed by PMTCT; linkage, retention and adherence to care for infected children; and the growing cohort of HIV-exposed and uninfected children.

{Photo credit: Rachel Hassinger/MSH}Photo credit: Rachel Hassinger/MSH

MSH spoke with Sandra Guerrier, Ph, MSc, project director for the USAID-funded Leadership, Management & Sustainability Project in Haiti (LMS Haiti)—one of four MSH projects in the country. Tell us about LMS and MSH’s presence in Haiti.

 {Photo credit: Yvonne Otieno/MSH}Dr. John Chimumbwa, Health Commodities and Services Management (HCSM) program Chief of Party, speaks at the launch.Photo credit: Yvonne Otieno/MSH

Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH) unveiled a new drug formulary, the first of its kind in Kenya, on September 6, 2013. The formulary consists of a list of all drugs used at KNH and guidelines on prescribing, dispensing, and providing medicine information to patients. 

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman, Ethiopia.}Photo credit: Warren Zelman, Ethiopia.

HIV and AIDS patients worldwide depend on lifesaving drugs to extend their lives and improve their quality of life. In Ethiopia, where an estimated 2.2 million people are living with HIV and AIDS, access to these lifesaving medicines, particularly for people living outside of the capital city, means depending on an efficient and effective pharmaceutical supply chain to get the medicines to keep them alive.

{Photo credit: MSH}Photo credit: MSH

Management Sciences for Health—with financial support from The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, USAID and other partners—has been working in Tanzania on scaling up the Accredited Drug Dispensing Outlets (ADDO) Program since 2002, in support of the Government of Tanzania's efforts to improve access to essential medicines and pharmaceutical services.

 {Photo credit: Rui Pires}Accredited drug shop (ADS) in Uganda.Photo credit: Rui Pires

The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that nearly one-third of the developing world population lacks regular access to quality essential medicines. In rural areas of sub-Saharan Africa, most people first turn to community drug shops for their medicines; yet these shops may not be legally licensed, have trained staff, or sell quality-assured medicines. Committed to Expanding Access to Quality Essential Medicines 

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