Pharmaceutical Management: Our Impact

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman}Photo credit: Warren Zelman

The USAID MTaPS Program, led by MSH, is on the frontlines supporting USAID’s efforts to contain the spread of the COVID-19 virus in high-risk countries. The program’s mandate includes advancing the Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA) and is, therefore, well equipped to respond to global public health emergencies such as the current outbreak.  MTaPS has formed a COVID-19 response team to assist countries in developing a rapid response action plan to manage the outbreak.

{Photo Credit: Rui Pires}Photo Credit: Rui Pires

Excessive bleeding after birth is the leading cause of maternal mortality worldwide, killing nearly 200 women a day.

{Photo Credit: Rui Pires}Photo Credit: Rui Pires

In Uganda, 4 in 10 maternal deaths are caused by postpartum hemorrhage, or excessive bleeding after childbirth. Intravenous oxytocin is the treatment of choice for managing postpartum hemorrhage at a health facility but must be stored between 2oC and 8oC to remain effective. The country’s cold chain infrastructure is weak, however, particularly at lower level health facilities, where half of all assisted births occur. The majority of these facilities only have refrigerators that are specifically procured and used for the storage of vaccines.

 {Photo credit: MSH staff}The Koboko District Rapid Response team and partners discuss medicines and medical supplies to order through the eELMISPhoto credit: MSH staff

Read the original story on the USAID websiteIdentifying opportunities to improve global health requires innovation and creative thinking. In developing countries such as Uganda, the COVID-19 pandemic is impacting an already-strained health system. Access to primary health care remains difficult for many people, and quality of care is inconsistent, with limited drugs, supplies, and human resources.

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman}Photo credit: Warren Zelman

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), an estimated 1 in 10 pharmaceutical products sold globally is falsified or substandard, with deadly effects and the situation is known to be far worse in certain regions of the world; in 2013 alone, falsified malaria medicines killed more than 120,000 children in Africa.  Meanwhile, WHO surveys in 2018 estimated that only about one-third of National Regulatory Authorities (NRAs) had the capacity to effectively regulate medical products in their hospitals, pharmacies, and communities, with only one of those NRAs being in Africa.The WHO

In April 2019, the USAID Safe, Affordable, and Effective Medicines for Ukrainians (SAFEMed) Activity supported the National Health Service of Ukraine with the introduction of electronic prescriptions, also known as e-prescriptions, to complement and advance Ukraine's medicines reimbursement program. At little or no cost, patients can access select medicines, which family doctors electronically prescribe, to treat cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, or bronchial asthma.

The USAID MTaPS Program is supporting the Philippines in responding to the COVID-19 pandemic in the country. The concerted effort is a partnership of USAID with the Philippines Department of Health (DoH), the World Health Organization (WHO), and UNICEF.  MTaPS is assisting in two technical areas critical to managing and controlling the pandemic: infection prevention and control (IPC) and supply chain management of essential emergency commodities.

Photo credit: Amany AyubPhoto credit: Amany Ayub

The USAID MTaPS Program is supporting the Government of Bangladesh to manage and contain the COVID-19 pandemic.

{Photo credit: Christina Mchau}Photo credit: Christina Mchau

Preventing and controlling the spread of infectious diseases is key to protecting the health of both patients and health care workers (HCWs). This is an urgent need in Tanzania, and not only because of the threat of COVID-19, but also to make the country vigilant about stopping the spread of HIV, tuberculosis, and antimicrobial-resistant infections. From a 2011 WHO meta-analysis, 15 in 100 people who receive health care services in Tanzania will acquire an infection while doing so. 

Photo credit: MSH

The USAID Medicines, Technologies and Pharmaceutical Services (MTaPS) Program, led by MSH, is working with the Government of Bangladesh and other stakeholders to develop an online reporting system that will strengthen supply chain management for commodities needed to prevent and treat COVID-19 at health facilities.Bangladesh’s COVID-19 objectives are to increase border security to curb the entry of COVID-19 patients, identify cases early, update the country’s laboratory capacity to test for the virus, and prepare the public health system to respond to an outbreak. Following th

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