Bibliography of the Literatures on Tuberculosis, TB/HIV and MDR-TB in Ethiopia from 2001–2017

Journal Article
  • Nigussie Assefa Kassaw
  • Jemal Haidar
  • Dawit Assefa
  • Daniel Fiseha
  • Dereje Habte
  • Ahmed Bedru
  • Damen Haile Mariam
Ethiopian Journal of Health Sciences
Dec. 2020; 30 (6, special issue): 3. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ejhs.v30i1.2S.

Abstract

Ethiopia is among the thirty high tuberculosis (TB) burden countries with multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and Tuberculosis/Human Immunodeficiency Virus (TB/HIV). Given the public health importance of the problem, it is apparent that probing the work done in this regard is essential to mitigate the problem and thus we reviewed research repositories and compile directories of researches in Ethiopia from Jan 1, 2001 to Dec 30, 2017 in order to avail evidence-based information to stakeholders and beneficiaries intervening the problem in the country. The evidences generated in this bibliography are through different databases and websites using key terms. A range of different published and unpublished literatures (journal articles, conference presentations, reports/manual/book, and graduate theses or dissertations) on TB, MDR-TB, extensively drug resistant TB (XDR-TB), or TB/HIV are presented. We presented literatures by four themes (Biomedical and clinical researches, epidemiological researches, operational or implementation researches, and health systems researches). A total of 1571 researches and reports were accessed through the above search engines and revealed 635 epidemiological researches followed by 538 clinical or biomedical researches, 257 operational or implementation research, and 141 health systems research. Interestingly, up to 2008 clinical or biomedical researchers were the leading researches and from 2009 onwards, epidemiological researches held the largest constituency. In conclusion, TB or TB/HIV and MDR-TB literatures in Ethiopia have substantially increased over years. Referred journal publications took the leading source and epidemiologic studies were the commonest one. We suggest the need to focus on operational or implementation and health system researches to plummet the disease spreading, drug resistance and impact. We also recommend a regular update of the bibliography every 3 to 4 years with annotations.