Resources

Results 201 - 225 of 1388

Summary Despite the global initiative to eliminate mother-to-child transmission of HIV, 210,000 new pediatric infections were added worldwide in 2012 to the existing pool of 3.4 million children living with the virus. Children are more vulnerable to HIV infection and have higher morbidity and mortality.

Lessons learned from treating patients with HIV infection can inform care systems for other chronic conditions. For antiretroviral treatment, attending appointments on time correlates with medication adherence; however, HIV clinics in East Africa, where attendance rates vary widely, rarely include systems to schedule appointments or to track missed appointments or patient follow-up.

Achieving high rates of adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in resource-poor settings comprises serious, but different, challenges in both the first months of treatment and during the life-long maintenance phase. We measured the impact of a health system-oriented, facility-based intervention to improve clinic attendance and patient adherence. We conducted the study in 12 rural district hospitals (6 intervention, 6 control) in Kenya and randomly selected 1,894 adult patients over 18 years of age in two cohorts. Among experienced patients, the percentage attending the clinic on or before a scheduled appointment increased in both level and trend (increase per month) following the intervention, as did the level and trend of those keeping appointments within three days.

The aim of this study was to assess predictors of mortality among TB-HIV co-infected patients being treated for TB in Northwest Ethiopia. An institution-based retrospective cohort study was conducted between April, 2009 and January, 2012. Despite the availability of free ART from health institutions in Northwest Ethiopia, mortality was high among TB-HIV co-infected patients, and strongly associated with the absence of ART during TB treatment. In addition cotrimoxazole prophylactic therapy remained important factor in reduction of mortality during TB treatment. The study also noted importance of early ART even at higher CD4 counts.

Integrated community case management (iCCM) has proven to be an effective strategy for expanding the provision of diarrhea, pneumonia, and malaria services and has been accepted as a key approach to meet Millennium Development Goal 4 on reducing child mortality by international donors and developing countries.

On November 12, 2009, Uganda’s Honorable Minister of Health, Dr.

A guide to evaluate whether health information products and services meet the requirements needed to make them effective, used, and adapted by health care practitioners and policymakers in the field.

Background: Worldwide, there were 650,000 multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) cases in 2010, and in 2008 the World Health Organization estimated that 150,000 deaths occurred annually due to MDR-TB. Ethiopia is 15th among the 27 MDR-TB high-burden countries.

Increasing coverage of isoniazid preventive therapy and cotrimoxazole preventive therapy reduced risk of TB among HIV patients who started treatment. All people living with HIV should be screened for TB, but for patients who have advanced disease (WHO clinical stage III/IV, bedridden, and with hemoglobin level of 10 mg/dl), intensified screening is highly recommended during treatment follow-up.

A poster presented at the Union World Conference on Lung Health 2012 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. 

A presentation delivered at the Union World Conference on Lung Health 2012 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.  Presentation Outline Background ChallengestoimplementingTBservices Interventionsapplied Results and lessons learned Recommendations Conclusion   

Performance-based financing is increasingly being applied in a variety of contexts, with the expectation that it can improve the performance of health systems. However, while there is a growing literature on implementation issues and effects on outputs, there has been relatively little focus on interactions between PBF and health systems and how these should be studied. This paper aims to contribute to filling that gap by developing a framework for assessing the interactions between PBF and health systems, focusing on low and middle income countries. In doing so, it elaborates a general framework for monitoring and evaluating health system reforms in general.

The Republic of South Sudan has faced a lot of challenges, such as a lack of infrastructure, human resources and an enormous burden of vector borne diseases including malaria. While a national malaria strategic plan 2006-2011 was developed, the vector control component has remained relatively weak.

The HRH Action Framework is designed to assist governments and health managers to develop and implement strategies to achieve an effective and sustainable health workforce. By using a comprehensive approach, the Framework will help you address staff shortages, uneven distribution of staff, gaps in skills and competencies, low retention and poor motivation, among other challenges.

The Human Resources for Health Action Framework (HAF) was developed by representatives of multilateral and bilateral agencies, donors, partner countries, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and the academic community at a technical consultation in Washington, DC, on December 14–15, 2005. The World Health Organization (WHO) and the U.S.

The Human Resource Management (HRM) Rapid Assessment Tool offers a method for assessing an organization’s human resource management system and how well it functions. This tool helps users to develop strategies to improve the human resource management system and make it as effective as possible. It is designed to be used in public and private health organizations.

A broken health system is a silent killer. It results in more illness and death despite the fact that the public health and medical knowledge exists to greatly reduce illness and save millions of lives every year, especially in developing countries. What is missing is the leadership capacity to ensure that the management systems are in place to apply and scale up this knowledge.

An Open Mind and a Hard Back: Conversations with African Women Leaders is a summary of interviews conducted with over a dozen women leaders from Burkina Faso, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Liberia, Mauritius, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Swaziland, Uganda, and Zambia.

This quarterly bulletin provides information on the activities of the Integrated Health Systems Strengthening Project (IHSSP). Funded by USAID and led by Management Sciences for Health, IHSPP combines evidence-based approaches, proven service delivery strategies, and extensive public health expertise to support the Rwandan Ministry of Health in building its health system.

Drawing on their experience in a range of developing countries, including 20 years of long-term experience in Afghanistan, Cambodia, Indonesia, and the Philippines, Steve and Cathy Solter identify 10 important lessons about assisting ministries of health Pursuing true country ownership for effective programs requires a long-term approach involving persistence, patience, keen understanding of counterparts’ perspective, deference, building of trust, focus on priorities, technical competence, and sustained optimism.

Chronic diseases—including cancers, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and asthma—represent a rising health burden in developing countries. Of the 36-million annual chronic disease deaths, 80 percent occur in low- and middle-income countries. Eight million of these deaths are preventable through changes in lifestyle and access to quality, affordable health services.

Prepared by the AIDSTAR-Two project, this technical brief presents the results of an extensive literature and tools review conducted in 2009 that identified critical needs in the area of capacity building, including improved monitoring and evaluation, increased focus on basing capacity building programs on assessment, and wider dissemination of tools and approaches.

Prepared by the USAID-funded AIDSTAR-Two project, this technical brief discusses country ownership in the context of organizational capacity building in public institutions and civil society organizations in the health sector.

This technical brief developed by the AIDSTAR-Two project examines a specific cadre of health workers, child and youth care workers.

Santé pour le Développement et la Stabilité d’Haïti (SDSH) has helped over one million people receive HIV tests and learn their status. Every year SDSH made it possible for over 13,000 women to deliver their child with assistance from a facility- based, skilled provider, and has reached more than half a million children each year with nutrition services.

Pages